World Hepatitis Day

World Hepatitis Day is July 28th! Below are some facts about Hepatitis. 

What is Hepatitis? 

      Hepatitis is the inflammation of the liver. The liver helps process nutrients, filter blood, and fight infections. Hepatitis can be caused by heavy alcohol use, toxins, some medications, certain medical conditions, and commonly a virus. The most common types of Hepatitis are Hepatitis A, B, and C. 

For more information, go to https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/abc/index.htm

 

Hepatitis A Facts

  • Hepatitis A is caused by the Hepatitis A virus. 
  • There are about 2,500 new infections each year. 
  • There is an effective vaccine available. 
    • All of the following should receive the vaccine. 
      • Children at the age of 1
      • Travelers going to areas where Hepatitis A is common
      • Family and caregivers of children who were adopted from areas where Hepatitis A is common
      • Men who have sex with men
      • Drug users
      • People with certain medical conditions especially those with liver diseases
  • Outbreaks still occur in the U.S. 
  • Hepatitis A is common in many countries especially those without modern sanitation. 
  • Hepatitis A can last from several weeks to several months. 
  • Hepatitis A spreads through a person eating microscopic amounts fecal matter. 
  • Hepatitis A can be deadly!
  • Testing for Hepatitis A is not recommended. 

For more information, go to https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/abc/index.htm

 

Hepatitis B Facts

  • Hepatitis B is caused by the Hepatitis B virus. 
  • Approximately 800,000-2.2 million people are living with chronic Hepatitis B. 
  • There are about 19,200 new cases of Hepatitis B each year. 
  • Approximately, 2 in every 3 people who have Hepatitis B know that they are infected. 
  • Hepatitis B is a leading cause of liver cancer. 
  • Hepatitis B can last for a few weeks to a lifetime. 
  • 90% of infants, who are not vaccinated and develop Hepatitis B, develop a chronic infection. 
  • 6%-10% of older children and adults, who get infected, develop chronic Hepatitis B. 
  • Hepatitis B is transmitted through
    • Bodily fluids
    • Birth from an infected mother
    • Sex with an infected person
    • Sharing contaminated equipment
    • Sharing contaminated personal items
    • Poor infection control
  • The following people should be vaccinated
    • All infants at birth
    • Unvaccinated adults with diabetes
    • Uninfected household members and sexual partners with Hepatitis B
    • People with multiple sex partners
    • People seeking evaluation or treatment for an STD
    • Drug users especially those who inject drugs
    • Men who have sex with men
    • People with certain medical conditions like HIV or chronic liver disease
    • Travelors to places where Hepatitis B is common
  • Treatment includes
    • Nothing for acute patients
    • Antivirals for chronic patients
  • The following people should be tested for Hepatitis B
    • People born in regions where Hepatitis B is at moderate to high levels
    • Americans who were not vaccinated and live in areas where Hepatitis B is common
    • Household, needle-sharing, or sex contacts with people who have Hepatitis B
    • Men who have sex with men
    • People who inject drugs
    • Patients with abnormal liver tests
    • Hemodialysis patients
    • People needing immunosuppressive or cytotoxic therapy
    • HIV-infected people
    • All pregnant women

For more information, go to https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/abc/index.htm

 

Hepatitis C Facts 

  • Hepatitis C is caused by the Hepatitis C virus. 
  • Approximately 2.7-3.9 million people live with chronic Hepatitis C. 
  • There are about 30,500 new Hepatitis C cases each year.
  • Approximately 50% of people with Hepatitis C didn’t know that they were infected. 
  • 3 in 4 people with Hepatitis C were born between 1945-1965. 
  • Hepatitis C is a leading cause of liver transplants and liver cancer. 
  • Hepatitis C can last for a week weeks or be a lifelong serious condition. 
  • Most people infected develop the chronic version. 
    • 75%-85% of people who get infected develop the chronic condition. 
    • 1%-5% of Hepatitis C infected people develop cirrhosis or liver cancer. 
  • Hepatitis C is spread through
    • Blood
    • Sharing contaminated equipment
    • Receiving a blood transfusion or organ  before 1992
    • Poor infection control
  • There are no vaccines for Hepatitis C. 
  • Treatments include
    • Antivirals and supportive care for acute cases
    • Regular monitoring or antivirals for chronic cases
  • People who should be tested include
    • People born between 1945-1965
    • Recipients of clotting factor concentrates before 1987
    • Recipients of blood transfusions or organs before July 1992
    • People who are exposed to Hepatitis C patients
    • HIV infected patients
    • People with signs or symptoms of liver diseases

For more information, go to https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/abc/index.htm

Symptoms of Hepatitis

  • Fever
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of Appetite 
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal Pain
  • Dark Urine
  • Grey-Colored Stools
  • Joint Pain
  • Jaundice 

For more information, go to https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/abc/index.htm

Information Courtesy of the CDC